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A Happy St. Patrick’s Day To All You Rocketeers!!!

Crowds Panic As Flood Threatens Ireland!

Just a little Irish humor on this most wonderful of Holy Days.

In Boston we take our St. Patrick’s Day celebrations very seriously. This “most Irish of all American cities” celebrated with a paid holiday for all City of Boston municipal employees and Massachusetts state employees. You see, Boston political offices and the city payroll were dominated by the Irish for the past 150 years or so and those folks wanted a day-off to celebrate the Patron Saint of Ireland’s special day in a big way. Problem was, that whole “separation of church and state” thing. Not to be dissuaded however, the Irish did a little bit of historical research and sure and begorra they discovered that March 17th was the day in 1776 that British forces evacuated the city following the Siege of Boston. This was great news because they could now pass a law commemorating “Evacuation Day” as a legitimate paid holiday. As a nod to the true intent of their action however, the signatures on the bill were in green ink.

All good things however, must come to an end. In 2010, the state legislature debated eliminating Evacuation Day as an official holiday, citing the expense of giving state and local workers paid days off. The state’s FY2011 budget requires all state and municipal offices in Suffolk County be open on both days.

Lynnrockets however, is self employed and consequently the day shall be free for imbibing!

Until I return tomorrow, please enjoy some fine non-traditional Irish music and maybe a Guinness or two as well…

Sláinte!

Friday Night Irish Music Byte

Irish music week continues…

From Allmusic we learn that despite a huge hit single in the mid-’70s (“The Boys Are Back in Town”) and becoming a popular act with hard rock/heavy metal fans, Thin Lizzy are still, in the pantheon of ’70s rock bands, under-appreciated. Formed in the late ’60s by Irish singer/songwriter/bassist Phil Lynott, Lizzy, though not the first band to do so, combined romanticized working-class sentiments with their ferocious, twin-lead guitar attack. As the band’s creative force, Lynott was a more insightful and intelligent writer than many of his ilk, preferring slice-of-life working-class dramas of love and hate influenced by Bob Dylan, Bruce Springsteen, and virtually all of the Irish literary tradition. Also, as a black man, Lynott was an anomaly in the nearly all-white world of hard rock, and as such imbued much of his work with a sense of alienation; he was the outsider, the romantic guy from the other side of the tracks, a self-styled poet of the lovelorn and downtrodden. His sweeping vision and writerly impulses at times gave way to pretentious songs aspiring to clichéd notions of literary significance, but Lynott’s limitless charisma made even the most misguided moments worth hearing.

Sadly, Lynott died in 1986 at the age of 35 as the result of his longtime abuse of heroin, cocaine and alcohol, but the alcohol really was not his fault inasmuch as he was, after all, Irish. The following is a videoclip of Thin Lizzy performing an amped up version of the traditional Irish song, Whiskey In The Jar on Britain’s Top Of The Pops in 1973.

Saturday Night Music Byte

From Allmusic we learn that despite a huge hit single in the mid-’70s (“The Boys Are Back in Town”) and becoming a popular act with hard rock/heavy metal fans, Thin Lizzy are still, in the pantheon of ’70s rock bands, under-appreciated. Formed in the late ’60s by Irish singer/songwriter/bassist Phil Lynott, Lizzy, though not the first band to do so, combined romanticized working-class sentiments with their ferocious, twin-lead guitar attack. As the band’s creative force, Lynott was a more insightful and intelligent writer than many of his ilk, preferring slice-of-life working-class dramas of love and hate influenced by Bob Dylan, Bruce Springsteen, and virtually all of the Irish literary tradition. Also, as a black man, Lynott was an anomaly in the nearly all-white world of hard rock, and as such imbued much of his work with a sense of alienation; he was the outsider, the romantic guy from the other side of the tracks, a self-styled poet of the lovelorn and downtrodden. His sweeping vision and writerly impulses at times gave way to pretentious songs aspiring to clichéd notions of literary significance, but Lynott’s limitless charisma made even the most misguided moments worth hearing.

Sadly, Lynott died in 1986 at the age of 35 as the result of his longtime abuse of heroin, cocaine and alcohol, but the alcohol really was not his fault inasmuch as he was, after all, Irish. The following is a videoclip of Thin Lizzy performing an amped up version of the traditional Irish song, Whiskey In The Jar on Britain’s Top Of The Pops in 1973.

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