Blog Archives

Martin Luther King Day Music Bytes (and Special Notice)

I am not capable of coming up with anything new or novel to write about Martin Luther King. For many years and through the present, numerous others have been more than adept at capturing the spirit of a man that bettered our nation. In an attempt to present MLK in a few different and musical ways, Lynnrockets will simply provide a few music bytes that were inspired by the man that inspired so many. Please enjoy and try to do something nice for somebody today.

UB40 – “King”

Patty Griffin – “Up To The Mountain”

Kris Kristofferson – “They Killed Him”

Queen – “One Vision”

James Taylor – “Shed A Little Light”

U2 – “Pride (In The Name Of Love)”

You knew I had to throw in an Irish one now didn’t you?

SPECIAL NOTICE:

Making a Difference in Anchorage

Alaskans are the people who seem to know Sarah Palin best, and object to her most.  Democrats, Independents, and Republicans are each susceptible to PDS (Palin Derangement Syndrome).  Hope is coming to Alaska.  Malia Litman, blogger at malialitman.wordpress.com and author of The Ignorance Virtues of Sarah Palin: A Humorous Refudiation of the Half-Term Ex-Governor  will be at Borders at 1100 E. Dimond Blvd, Anchorage on Sat. Jan. 22nd at 2:00.  Malia will give a presentation and sign books, guaranteed to provide much needed relief for PDS.  If you are one of the unfortunate Americans afflicted with this disability condition, come to Borders on Saturday.  Together we can find comfort and therapeutic relief for our ailment.  Please join Malia.

Thursday Night Music Byte

Lynnrockets recently watched the film Julie & Julia about a thirty year old New Yorker who decided to cook every dish in one of Julia Childs’ cookbooks and to blog about it. It was a novel idea so we decided to copy it. No, we will not be cooking in the usual sense (that could start a fire). Rather, we will adapt the recipe a day concept to our nightly music bytes. From now to infinity (didn’t somebody else coin that phrase?) we will post a music video and brief description of the artist or song in a sort of alphabetical order as culled from Tom Moon’s wonderful reference book, 1,000 Recordings To Hear Before You Die (A Listener’s Life List). The book describes both whole albums (remember those) and individual songs from all music genres that are essential listening. Do yourselves a favor and purchase this book. Where the book deals with an individual song, we will post that song, but when an entire album is the subject, we will exercise judicial discretion and post a single song therefrom. So what do you say, let’s get cooking…

U

U2                          The Joshua Tree – “Where The Streets Have No Name” (1987)

Through a combination of zealous righteousness and post-punk experimentalism, U2 became one of the most popular rock & roll bands of the ’80s. They were rock & roll crusaders during an era of synthesized pop and heavy metal, equally known for their sweeping sound as for their grandiose statements about politics and religion. The Edge provided the group with a signature sound by creating sweeping sonic landscapes with his heavily processed, echoed guitars. Though the Edge’s style wasn’t conventional, the rhythm section of Larry Mullen, Jr. and Adam Clayton played the songs as driving hard rock, giving the band a forceful, powerful edge that was designed for arenas. And their lead singer, Bono, was a frontman with a knack of grand gestures that played better in stadiums than small clubs. It’s no accident that footage of Bono parading with a white flag with “Sunday Bloody Sunday” blaring in the background became the defining moment of U2′s early career — there rarely was a band that believed so deeply in rock’s potential for revolution as U2, and there rarely was a band that didn’t care if they appeared foolish in the process.

The Joshua Tree is U2’s vision quest, a tear through the vast open spaces of mythic America in search of illumination, if not personal truth. There is doubt in these songs with youthful idealism replaced by a slightly wary sense of the world. The refrains remind that fame and fortune isn’t everything (“I Still Haven’t Found What I’m Looking For”), and how the search for understanding can be overwhelming (the album opens with “Where The Streets Have No Name” and after a two minute instrumental surge, that is one of the great crescendos in rock, the first words are, “I want to run, I want to hide, I want to tear down the walls that hold me inside”). Some great rock affirms life as it is. This sweeping, majestic album is concerned with possibilities and ideals not yet glimpsed.

Saturday Night Irish Music Byte

Through a combination of zealous righteousness and post-punk experimentalism, U2 became one of the most popular rock & roll bands of the ’80s. They were rock & roll crusaders during an era of synthesized pop and heavy metal, equally known for their sweeping sound as for their grandiose statements about politics and religion. The Edge provided the group with a signature sound by creating sweeping sonic landscapes with his heavily processed, echoed guitars. Though the Edge’s style wasn’t conventional, the rhythm section of Larry Mullen, Jr. and Adam Clayton played the songs as driving hard rock, giving the band a forceful, powerful edge that was designed for arenas. And their lead singer, Bono, was a frontman with a knack of grand gestures that played better in stadiums than small clubs. It’s no accident that footage of Bono parading with a white flag with “Sunday Bloody Sunday” blaring in the background became the defining moment of U2’s early career — there rarely was a band that believed so deeply in rock’s potential for revolution as U2, and there rarely was a band that didn’t care if they appeared foolish in the process.


New Year’s Day Music Byte

Boston's "First Night" celebration.

U2 are a rock band from Dublin, Ireland. The group consists of Bono (vocals and rhythm guitar), The EdgeAdam Clayton (bass guitar), and Larry Mullen, Jr. (drums and percussion). (guitar, keyboards, and vocals),

The band formed at secondary school in 1976 when the members were teenagers with limited musical proficiency. Within four years, they signed to Island Records and released their debut album. By the mid-1980s, they had become a top international act. They were more successful as a live act than they were at selling records, until their 1987 album The Joshua Tree, which, according to Rolling Stone, elevated the band’s stature “from heroes to superstars”. Their 1991 album Achtung Baby and the accompanying Zoo TV Tour were a musical and thematic reinvention for the band. Reacting to their own sense of musical stagnation and a late-1980s critical backlash, U2 incorporated dance music and alternative rock into their sound and performances, replacing their earnest image with a more ironic tone. Similar experimentation continued for the remainder of the 1990s. Since 2000, U2 have pursued a more conventional sound, while maintaining influences from their previous musical explorations.

U2 have released 12 studio albums and are among the most critically and commercially successful groups in popular music. They have won 22 Grammy Awards, more than any other band, and they have sold more than 145 million records In 2005, the band were inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame in their first year of eligibility. Rolling Stone magazine listed U2 at #22 in its list of the 100 greatest artists of all time. Throughout their career, as a band and as individuals, they have campaigned for human rights and philanthropic causes, including Amnesty International, the ONE Campaign, Product Red, and Bono’s DATA campaign.

New Year’s Day”  is the third track from their 1983 album War and it was released as the album’s lead single in January 1983. Written about the PolishSolidarity movement, “New Year’s Day” is driven by Adam Clayton’s distinctive bassline and The Edge’s keyboard playing. It was the band’s first UK hit single, peaking at #10 on the singles chart, #11 on the Dutch Top 40 and charting on the Billboard Hot 100 for the first time in their career. In 2004, Rolling Stone magazine placed the single at #427 on their list of “The 500 Greatest Songs of All Time”.

Please enjoy this video clip of U2 performing “New Year’s Day”. Oh, and let’s go Boston Bruins!!!