Daily Archives: August 5, 2010

Thursday Night Music Byte

Lynnrockets recently watched the film Julie & Julia about a thirty year old New Yorker who decided to cook every dish in one of Julia Childs’ cookbooks and to blog about it. It was a novel idea so we decided to copy it. No, we will not be cooking in the usual sense (that could start a fire). Rather, we will adapt the recipe a day concept to our nightly music bytes. From now to infinity (didn’t somebody else coin that phrase?) we will post a music video and brief description of the artist or song in a sort of alphabetical order as culled from Tom Moon’s wonderful reference book, 1,000 Recordings To Hear Before You Die (A Listener’s Life List). The book describes both whole albums (remember those) and individual songs from all music genres that are essential listening. Do yourselves a favor and purchase this book. Where the book deals with an individual song, we will post that song, but when an entire album is the subject, we will exercise judicial discretion and post a single song therefrom. So what do you say, let’s get cooking…

U

U2                          The Joshua Tree – “Where The Streets Have No Name” (1987)

Through a combination of zealous righteousness and post-punk experimentalism, U2 became one of the most popular rock & roll bands of the ’80s. They were rock & roll crusaders during an era of synthesized pop and heavy metal, equally known for their sweeping sound as for their grandiose statements about politics and religion. The Edge provided the group with a signature sound by creating sweeping sonic landscapes with his heavily processed, echoed guitars. Though the Edge’s style wasn’t conventional, the rhythm section of Larry Mullen, Jr. and Adam Clayton played the songs as driving hard rock, giving the band a forceful, powerful edge that was designed for arenas. And their lead singer, Bono, was a frontman with a knack of grand gestures that played better in stadiums than small clubs. It’s no accident that footage of Bono parading with a white flag with “Sunday Bloody Sunday” blaring in the background became the defining moment of U2′s early career — there rarely was a band that believed so deeply in rock’s potential for revolution as U2, and there rarely was a band that didn’t care if they appeared foolish in the process.

The Joshua Tree is U2’s vision quest, a tear through the vast open spaces of mythic America in search of illumination, if not personal truth. There is doubt in these songs with youthful idealism replaced by a slightly wary sense of the world. The refrains remind that fame and fortune isn’t everything (“I Still Haven’t Found What I’m Looking For”), and how the search for understanding can be overwhelming (the album opens with “Where The Streets Have No Name” and after a two minute instrumental surge, that is one of the great crescendos in rock, the first words are, “I want to run, I want to hide, I want to tear down the walls that hold me inside”). Some great rock affirms life as it is. This sweeping, majestic album is concerned with possibilities and ideals not yet glimpsed.

Stupid Tea-Baggers Seek Advice From Colonial Reenactors

This week’s episode of “Can You Believe They’re As Dumb As They Look?” features members of the Tea Party. The Washington Post reports that Tea Party activists are flocking to Virginia’s tourist attraction known as Colonial Williamsburg so as to seek advise from the costumed reenactment actors about how to rebel against 21st century politicians. We are not kidding. This is really happening.

They cheer and hoot when General George Washington surveys the troops behind the original 18th-century courthouse. And they shout out about the tyranny of our current government during scenes depicting the nation’s struggle for freedom from Britain.

“General, when is it appropriate to resort to arms to fight for our liberty?’’ asked a tourist on a recent weekday during “A Conversation with George Washington,’’ a hugely popular dialogue between actor and audience in the shaded backyard of Charlton’s Coffeehouse.

Standing on a simple wooden stage before a crowd of about 100, the man portraying Washington replied: “Only when all peaceful remedies have been exhausted. Or if we are forced to do so in our own self-defense.’’

The tourist, a self-described conservative activist named Ismael Nieves from Elmer, N.J., nodded thoughtfully. Afterward, he said this was his fifth visit to Colonial Williamsburg.

“We live in a very dangerous time,’’ Nieves said. “People are looking for leadership, looking for what to do. They’re looking to Washington, Jefferson, Madison.’’

“I want to get to know our Founding Fathers,’’ he added. “I think we’ve forgotten them. It’s like we’ve almost erased them from history.’’

“They all should come here and listen,’’ said Bob Rohrbacher, a retired plumber from Floral Park, N.Y., who opposes President Obama and was inspired to visit Williamsburg while watching Glenn Beck on Fox News. “They’ve forgotten about America.’’

One Tea-Bagger, wearing a red, white, and blue golf shirt emblazoned with the American flag and the text of the Declaration of Independence — joined the actors in exclaiming, “Well said!’’ every time a character uttered something patriotic.

The executives who oversee Williamsburg said they have noticed an alarming influx of Tea Partiers, and have also noted a rise in the number of guests who ply the costumed actors for advice. Think about the stupidity of these morons for a moment. Rather than taking the time to research and study the actual works of the real forefathers, these Tea-Baggers would rather just pack up the pick-up, travel to a tourist spot and ask soul searching questions to a bunch of costumed actors. Talk about the lazy man’s approach to learning. Heck, why don’t they just purchase the crib notes version of the Federalist Papers?

Is it any wonder that most Americans believe the Tea Party to be merely a misinformed radical fringe group?

Please remember to click on the song link below to familiarize yourselves with the tune and to have more fun singing along with today’s song parody.

It’s My Party song link: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mIsnIt1p978

IT’S OUR TEA PARTY

(sung to the Lesley Gore song “It’s My Party”)

It’s our tea party, and we’ll cry if we want to
Lie if we want to, die if we want to
You would cry too if you were in our zoo

Nobody knows just what planet we’re from
We have all lost our minds
But we will follow the plan
And misspell all of our signs

It’s our tea party, and we’ll cry if we want to
Lie if we want to, die if we want to
You would cry too if you looked like we do

Playin’ the race card because we’re all white
Swastikas define our style
When Glenn Beck’s eyes get teary
That just makes all of us smile

It’s our tea party, and we’ll cry if we want to
Lie if we want to, die if we want to
You would cry too if you were in our zoo

(musical interlude)

Our Sarah Palin behaves just like a whore
She’s a mean ding-a-ling
She tells us nothing but lies
We believe everything

It’s our tea party, and we’ll cry if we want to
Lie if we want to, die if we want to
You would cry too if you looked like we do

Oh, It’s our tea party, and we’ll cry if we want to
Lie if we want to, die if we want to
You would cry too if you were in our zoo

Oh, It’s our tea party, and we’ll cry if we want to
Lie if we want to, die if we want to…